Warm Up with a Glass of Wine and Our Fireplace

restaurant fireplace

As the temperatures drop outside, stay warm inside with a seat by our fireplace and a glass of City Winery North Coast Zin. It pairs perfectly with Chef Kristin’s spice crusted lamb loin. We  lit the restaurant fireplace for the first time today. Come down and warm up with us daily starting at 5pm.

restaurant fireplace 2

City Winery Finds a New Home in Nashville – Billboard.com

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There’s no shortage of performance venues in Nashville — it is Music City, after all — but Michael Dorf, owner of the just-opened City Winery, says he feels his establishment will offer fans a unique opportunity when watching live entertainment that will keep them coming back for more.

The businessman opened the first City Winery in New York. The original location allowed him to pair a winery with a music venue and see how the two could smash up in a city like New York. “I had been putting on shows for a long time and have been on tour with a number of bands,” he said. “I’ve done that for about 30 years. There was a need and an obvious opportunity for a higher-end concert experience that combined the elements of a seated environment with food and beverages into the overall experience. People are looking for more than French fries and beer. People care where their food comes from.”

Since then, Dorf has opened two other locations, in Chicago and Napa Valley. What led him to Nashville? “We were looking at where we really wanted to start to grow and show off the model, and there were a host of them. Nashville has so many great ingredients that it was a no-brainer. Between the convention center and what is going on from a real estate perspective, it just made sense. Obviously, the music industry is very well entrenched in Nashville and has been for a long time. But there was a missing piece between the Ryman and the smaller tourist venues on Broadway. There are some great venues like Franklin Theater and 3rd and Lindsley, but no one was approaching the culinary side the same way we are.”

The menu offers such fare as duck tacos, pan-roasted flatiron and leg of lamb flatbread, while the wine list includes over 400 selections. Musically, the lineup is very diverse, with such performers as Sandra BernhardLucinda WilliamsDr. Ralph StanleyK.T. Oslin and Joan Osborne booked for the fall lineup. Dorf says he wants a visit to City Winery to be one his clientele doesn’t forget.

“We really try to look at the complete experience at City Winery,” he said. “Years ago, we started a policy of having all of our staff read the book Setting the Tableby Danny Meyer, a restaurateur from New York.  It’s a book about enlightened hospitality and that the customer experience starts from the first moment you plan a visit to a venue to the memories that you have after you leave. We pay a lot of attention to the ticketing process — how customers learn about the shows, and even how they pick their seat. We’ve built a proprietary ticketing program that allows the patron to pick the actual seat that they sit in. If you become a VinoFile member, our annual membership program, you get advance notice when we announce the concert. As a member, you don’t have to pay any service charges. We know what it’s like when you want to see a show, and it might cost $25 to $40, and there’s a $9 service fee added on top of that, which can really be frustrating.”

If his past successes are any indication, Dorf is betting that Tennesseans will make City Winery a favorite hotspot in The 615 by simply satisfying the senses. “We believe what you hear, what you smell and taste all come together to enhance the experience. We look at the holistic 360-degree experience that a customer is going to have to make the evening as memorable and special as possible. Time is a precious commodity, and we all have choices as to where we spend that time. We want to make those couple of hours as terrific as possible. It then becomes self-fulfilling. When the artist knows that their fans are enjoying themselves, they put on a better show. I think we’ve built a better mousetrap, and I think people will love it in a town where people love music, wine and food.”

For the full article: http://www.billboard.com/articles/news/6281532/city-winery-nashville

Billboard: City Winery Finds New Home in Nashville

michael-dorf-city-winery-2014-billboard-650

There’s no shortage of performance venues in Nashville — it is Music City, after all — but Michael Dorf, owner of the just-opened City Winery, says he feels his establishment will offer fans a unique opportunity when watching live entertainment that will keep them coming back for more.

The businessman opened the first City Winery in New York. The original location allowed him to pair a winery with a music venue and see how the two could smash up in a city like New York. “I had been putting on shows for a long time and have been on tour with a number of bands,” he said. “I’ve done that for about 30 years. There was a need and an obvious opportunity for a higher-end concert experience that combined the elements of a seated environment with food and beverages into the overall experience. People are looking for more than French fries and beer. People care where their food comes from.”

Since then, Dorf has opened two other locations, in Chicago and Napa Valley. What led him to Nashville? “We were looking at where we really wanted to start to grow and show off the model, and there were a host of them. Nashville has so many great ingredients that it was a no-brainer. Between the convention center and what is going on from a real estate perspective, it just made sense. Obviously, the music industry is very well entrenched in Nashville and has been for a long time. But there was a missing piece between the Ryman and the smaller tourist venues on Broadway. There are some great venues like Franklin Theater and 3rd and Lindsley, but no one was approaching the culinary side the same way we are.”

The menu offers such fare as duck tacos, pan-roasted flatiron and leg of lamb flatbread, while the wine list includes over 400 selections. Musically, the lineup is very diverse, with such performers as Sandra Bernhard, Lucinda Williams, Dr. Ralph Stanley, K.T. Oslin and Joan Osborne booked for the fall lineup. Dorf says he wants a visit to City Winery to be one his clientele doesn’t forget.

“We really try to look at the complete experience at City Winery,” he said. “Years ago, we started a policy of having all of our staff read the book Setting the Table by Danny Meyer, a restaurateur from New York.  It’s a book about enlightened hospitality and that the customer experience starts from the first moment you plan a visit to a venue to the memories that you have after you leave. We pay a lot of attention to the ticketing process — how customers learn about the shows, and even how they pick their seat. We’ve built a proprietary ticketing program that allows the patron to pick the actual seat that they sit in. If you become a VinoFile member, our annual membership program, you get advance notice when we announce the concert. As a member, you don’t have to pay any service charges. We know what it’s like when you want to see a show, and it might cost $25 to $40, and there’s a $9 service fee added on top of that, which can really be frustrating.”

If his past successes are any indication, Dorf is betting that Tennesseans will make City Winery a favorite hotspot in The 615 by simply satisfying the senses. “We believe what you hear, what you smell and taste all come together to enhance the experience. We look at the holistic 360-degree experience that a customer is going to have to make the evening as memorable and special as possible. Time is a precious commodity, and we all have choices as to where we spend that time. We want to make those couple of hours as terrific as possible. It then becomes self-fulfilling. When the artist knows that their fans are enjoying themselves, they put on a better show. I think we’ve built a better mousetrap, and I think people will love it in a town where people love music, wine and food.”

 

For the full Billboard article, click here.

New things happening @ City Winery Every Weekend

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Ready to start the weekend out right? Well City Winery has just added Live Music with Dinner every Friday and Saturday night. Wesla Whitfield featuring Mike Greensill and Mads Tolling will rotate performances, so don’t miss your chance to enjoy the best FREE music the Napa Valley has to offer while sampling City Wineries NEW Fall Harvest Menu, or one of our over 30 wines on tap.

Also new for Weekends at City Winery Napa is our Brunch Menu being served every Saturday and Sunday from 10 AM to 3 PM. Local Napa residents get 25% off. Also a great place to enjoy our Bloody Mary.

Major Wine Main Break! City Winery NYC is open

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Water main break on Varick Street, New York City 

Contrary to a rumor that the City Winery grape crush at 5:45am this morning caused the main water break on Varick St. The wine is flowing, even gushing, next to the water main at City Winery New York. We are open for business. Come wine & dine with us ~ See you tonight!

image (7)     FIRST GIRAFFE- grapes dumped onto the conveyer belt

Grapes arriving at City Winery this morning ready for sorting and destemming. 

Wine-making secrets: Behind the scenes at City Winery – AM New York

By NINA RUGGIERO October 5, 2014

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Behind every bottle of wine is a long and complicated process. But at City Winery in SoHo, guests can opt to try it for themselves. We decided to dive in and get our hands dirty, and the rewards were fruitful, to say the least. Here’s what we learned.

 

Choose your grapes

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These are Syrah grapes, sent to SoHo from Mendocino County in northern California. They are described as peppery, meaty and tannic

(Credit: Nina Ruggiero)

Send them up, up and away!

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(Credit: Nina Ruggiero)

Once they arrive at City Winery, the bunches of grapes are sent up a conveyer belt, and dumped into the destemmer.

Drop them into the destemmer

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(Credit: Nina Ruggiero)

The destemmer removes the majority of the stems and leaves from the grapes. Stems are high in water and potassium, and, if left in, they take away from the wine’s acidity and color. Leaves left behind would create a distracting aroma.

Sort out any extra MOG

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(Credit: Nina Ruggiero)

MOG is a winemaker’s term for “material other than grapes.” After going through the destemmer, the grapes are hand-sorted, and any left-behind jacks (that’s a winemaker’s term for bunches of stems), leaves, and sometimes the occasional lizards and insects, are removed, along with any imperfect grapes.

What about the green ones?

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(Credit: Nina Ruggiero)

The majority of the grapes in this wine are Syrah, but some Viognier grapes are added as well. This is a nod to tradition; the two varieties grow side by side in the Rhone wine region of France. The blending of complimenting flavors (Viognier has more of a peachy taste) also adds an extra layer to the finished product. This is a Syrah wine. In the U.S., a wine must consist of at least 75 percent of one grape in order to take on its name.

It’s time for fermentation

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(Credit: Nina Ruggiero)

Fermentation is the step in the process that converts sugar to alcohol. Yeast will break down the sugars in the fruit, producing carbon dioxide and alcohol, and pushing the skins to the top. Winemakers call the layer that rises to the top the cap.

Punch down the cap

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The cap must be broken up and mixed in with the liquid several times every day so it doesn’t dry out. This is called maceration, and it can a difficult and dangerous job, due to the strength of the cap and the massive amounts of carbon dioxide involved.

Keep it comin’

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(Credit: Nina Ruggiero)

Once it’s ready, more wine of the same variety will be added to the top of the tank. The dispensers are at the bottom, so the oldest wine can be poured first, of course.

Let it age

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(Credit: Nina Ruggiero)

While some wines at City Winery are aged in steel tanks, others are aged in oak barrels in the cellar. Oak barrels add an extra dimension of flavor and aroma, though they typically lose about 30 percent of their flavor potential (and value) each year, making them the expensive route.

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(Credit: Nina Ruggiero)

You can visit City Winer to drink, dine, take in a show or make your own wine. Should you choose to make your own, you’ll be involved in every step of the process, from selecting the grapes to designing the label for the finished bottle. Learn more at citywinery.com.

New on the Scene: City Winery Nashville – Yahoo! Travel

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Music and wine – what else could you ask for? (Photo: Courtesy of City Winery Nashville)
 

There are already locations in New York City, Chicago, and Napa, and now hotspot City Winery comes to Nashville in the warehouse district of SoBro.

The 30,000-square-foot venue has an intimate 300-seat concert hall, a restaurant, and a private dining operation, as well as a fully-functional winery, the first of its kind in Music City.

“The heart of City Winery is its music and what better place than Music City to showcase all types of music in a unique, upscale setting with fine wine and food,” says CEO Michael Dorf.

The menu offers signature City Winery dishes, as well as Music City-inspired creations, and a choice of more than 400 wines.

Upcoming shows at the new Nashville location include The Secret Sisters, Darrell Scott, and Sandra Bernhard.

City Winery Nashville, 609 LaFayette Street

 

Full article: https://www.yahoo.com/travel/new-on-the-scene-city-winery-nashville-99078572022.html